Apple

Creating an App Database Backup with our Recipe Manager/Serving Sizer and Trip Boss apps

Your trip data and recipe data is extremely important to you! DO NOT DELETE the app, or you could lose your data! Create a backup!

Over the past few months, in dealing with update rejection issues with Trip Boss apps, and in dealing with the new bug in Recipe Manager with Serving Sizer (on iPad) introduced by updating to iOS 11.1.1, there has been increased stress for losing everything. Therefore, we want to better inform our customers on how to save an extra backup, for peace of mind.

In answering customer service requests, the biggest issue has been past issues with Restore from Backup (iCloud or iTunes), either because there was a hiccup, it was not possible to Restore from Backup, or it was not preferred to use that method. Whatever the reason, losing data is unacceptable, and it's been very frustrating communicating that THERE IS ANOTHER WAY. We have no direct communication with our customers--except when they read the description, but extra backup is a small item on the list of features. So we are trying many ways to communicate: This post intention is to better inform, and to step through the process. If you need more details, please contact us at support (at) creativealgorithms (dot) com. Now let's create a database backup! Read on!

Trip Boss iOS11 App Updates - Delay Explanation and Interim Options - UPDATED

We have a suite of travel apps, branded as Trip Boss XYZ (see the sidebar), that required updating to work on iOS 11. We almost got them updated in time, perhaps a week behind the release, but now some have been delayed by Apple through rejection in the review process. These apps are heavy on the customer data, so we wanted to get them into compliance and released before our customers deleted them (which deletes all the data) in frustration. Some customers have contacted us and we have provided guidance, but many of the thousands of customers are impossible to contact, since we have no method provided to us as developers. So the delays, potential impasse (it's very possible!) will leave our customers with potential losses of cherished travel memories and invaluable travel information that some of compiled for over seven years. This post will explain the status of the app rejections and review board appeal, and provide two paths to resolution for our customers (all hope is not lost). The choice of time, work, and/or cost is involved. Unfortunately, we cannot offer any more of a solution at this time. Our hands are tied by the review process.

Some Trip Boss Apps updated for iOS 11

Trip Boss travel manager and Trip Boss Travel Journal (new name) have been updated recently to comply to iOS 11.

     

Some bug fixes and enhancements have been added as well. Trip Boss Expense Manager (formerly Trip Boss Expense & Budget)

Dissecting the New AppStore – Adapt and Redesign your Shelf Space!

The new AppStore, redesigned for iOS6, has been out for just over a week now. Speaking recently at 360iDev, I stressed the importance of great shelf design in the AppStore as part of your marketing plan. Getting to know the new design is key to understanding how it will affect browsing, discovery, and buying habits, especially for developers, but also for consumers. I've been playing with the store all week, on several devices, including the new iPhone5, the iPad, and my old iPhone4. I've found, sales-wise, that some things have improved, some have been unaffected. The new AppStore was obviously designed with the iPad in mind—the cards work/look so much better on the iPad—there's more screen real estate, especially in landscape, so the the side scrolling is a plus. The iPhone5's speed was most likely a huge consideration—the new store screams on the iPhone5, but is slow and kludgy on the iPhone4. (I shudder to think how it is on the 3GS.) On older devices, the icons are slow to load; it reminds me of surfing the web on dial-up (well maybe not THAT slow). The new AppStore includes a few areas only previously exposed and featured on the desktop iTunes store—the “What's New?” and “What's Hot?” per category. We've been featured in this area with each of our new releases, but alas these apps have had little exposure because who shops via iTunes desktop any more? This post will cover details on what's new, what's missing, how it affects our app shopping experiences, and how as a developer we can maximize our sales potential by redesigning and focusing on certain areas of our shelf space.

On AppStore Search Ranking Algorithms

I just got back from a four day scout camping adventure with my son. It was nice to get away from technology for a while, but while I was gone, Apple changed their AppStore search algorithm! Our sales dropped by at least $30/day, which may not seem like a lot, but it adds up to $900/month, which is a major drop in income for a family trying to make a living off of the AppStore.

Real-World App Testing: Using Trip Boss Travel Manager on Vacation

Testing some productivity apps in a real-world situation is not always feasible. For example, we make a travel app, Trip Boss travel manager, for business and personal travel. Unless we plan a trip each time we test the app, testing will only be simulated travel. Day to day usage can be replicated, but actually using the app for travel can provide a new perspective on the app. True in-depth reviews are also rare, unless reviewers use the app to travel. Unfortunately, getting someone to review your app, let alone someone who just so happens to be traveling, is difficult to coordinate.

From Engineering to Tech Entrepreneurship, One Mom's Roadmap to Success

Recently my husband and I did a presentation at our daughter's 5th grade class on entrepreneurship, running a business, and making iOS apps. Our oldest daughter is writing an iPhone game with her dad, so was thrilled to be validated in front of her peers. It was very rewarding to us because we could introduce a seed of thought to the kids in the class—options! My mom's advice to me when I was a new mom was to expose my kids to as many things as I could—to show them they have choices in the world. We are thrilled to be able to have that chance to introduce the ambiguous world of entrepreneurship and encourage STEM. I had wished that entrepreneurship had been demystified for me when I was young. My parents intro'd me to a world of information and experiences, but I ended up quite risk-adverse; I even took an entrepreneurship class in my business master's program! So, here I am, an entrepreneur, running my own indie mobile development business with my husband. How did I get past all that fear of risk? Surprisingly, goals are what have driven me down this path, and those goals have as much to do with my children and family as my personal drive for achievement. In this post, I will share my story, from mechanical engineer to program manager to mom and president of my own company.

On Going Universal

The new iPad (aka 3rd generation) adds a new complexity to universal apps this week—high resolution images and graphics—which could quickly fill up that 16/32/64 GB storage space. In addition, other things happened this week—the 20 MB download limit over non-wifi (3G/4G/4LTE) increased to 50 MB. Updates are no longer showing up in New Releases. Considerations for going Universal may now shift. This post will discuss some of things to consider when deciding on a universal app vs a device-specific app.

Using Common Sense to Deliver Good Customer Service

Customer service can make or break your apps. Most people contact customer service for help, to complain, or to vent frustrations. If you're lucky, you'll get a rare email that raves about your app. Polite, prompt, and helpful responses can prevent frustrated customers from venting on the reviews, which can affect your overall rating, or even sales, if the reviewer brings up a perceived flaw of your app (merited or not!). Managing your customers satisfaction doesn't have to be hard. This post will cover some tips on a common sense approach to customer contact and how to provide exceptional customer service.

The Story of Serving Sizer, Lessons Learned in Successfully Evolving an App Over Time

My brother is always calling me with app ideas. One day, way back in late 2003, he suggested writing a calculator that took recipe ingredient amounts and adjusted them by changing the serving size. My husband, our developer, is an avid cook, so the idea intrigued him. He wasn't satisfied with just a multiplier, so he started creating a complicated algorithm for the Palm PDA that would also factor down the result into the simplest amount of steps. So, if you size up a recipe calling for 1-1/2 teaspoon from 4 servings to 14 servings, the little app would tell you “1 Tablespoon and 2-1/4 teaspoons”. He wasn't satisfied with just that, so he displayed the result also converted into metric. Thus Serving Sizer was born and released in February 2004, at the inexpensive price of $9.95. We've since 'ported the app to iOS, both for iPhone and iPad, learning many lessons along the way. Being able to react quickly to market realizations, potential for features, and more, has helped us along the way. This post will cover some of those lessons learned on the road to making Serving Sizer a successful app.

Syndicate content